PHILADELPHIA, Pa, August 20, 2020 — PolyCore Therapeutics LLC, a biopharmaceutical company developing treatments for patients suffering from dyskinesia and cognitive impairment associated with neurodegenerative disorders, today announced that it has been awarded a $1.5 million Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to advance preclinical studies of PCT-3012, a novel dopamine D3 receptor agonist to reduce motor impairment in Parkinson’s Disease patients.

Over 1 million Americans live with Parkinson’s Disease. The gold standard for treating the symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease is levodopa (L-dopa); however, within 3 to 5 years of treatment, approximately 50% of patients develop tolerance that necessitates higher doses taken more frequently and experience L-dopa induced dyskinesia, which manifests as abnormal involuntary body motions. PolyCore is developing PCT-3012, a novel dopamine D3 receptor agonist with a significantly differentiated mechanism of action, which is designed to improve motor symptoms without the development of tolerance, impulse control disorders and dyskinesia.

“We would like to thank the NIH for their support as we work to complete our IND-enabling studies and advance this program into the clinic,” said Kelly A. Beck, CEO of PolyCore. “The long-term effects of L-dopa, which include significant “off” times and dyskinesias, interfere with a patient’s daily life. Our hope is to provide a therapy that significantly reduces or eliminates these side effects.”

This research is supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R44NS117201. The content of this press release is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

About PolyCore Therapeutics
PolyCore Therapeutics LLC is a biopharmaceutical company developing treatments for patients suffering from dyskinesia and cognitive impairment associated with neurodegenerative disorders. PolyCore is currently conducting preclinical studies for its lead compound, PCT-3012, a novel small molecule for treatment of Parkinson’s motor symptoms in patients with early- to mid-stage Parkinson’s Disease. For more information, visit http://www.polycoretherapeutics.com.